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[EP-tech] Re: Import Medatada and Files



If you have a large number of eprints in one xml file, it may be better to import from the command line.  See http://wiki.eprints.org/w/API:bin/import <http://wiki.eprints.org/w/API:bin/import> -- and note the 'parse-only' option, which will tell you of any errors, but won't actually do an import.

--
Adam Field
Business Relationship Manager and Community Lead
EPrints Services

> On 22 Sep 2015, at 18:46, Andy Reid <Andy.Reid at lshtm.ac.uk> wrote:
> 
> You can put many eprints in one file
> 
> <eprints>
>  
>  
> <eprint>
> <type>article</type>
> ...
> </eprint>
> <eprint>
> ...
> </eprint>
> </eprints>
> Then import as 'Eprints XML' from the 'Manage Deposits' page.  There's an option to test without importing, so you can check your XML is clean and correct before committing.
> 
> Andy
> 
> 
> >>> Edwin Gamez <edwingamez19 at gmail.com> 22 September 2015 18:28 >>>
> Hi Andy!
> I am new to working with Eprints.
> 
> Now that you've followed the steps set me. How could it import?
> 
> Thanks!
> 
> 2015-09-22 10:30 GMT-06:00 Andy Reid <Andy.Reid at lshtm.ac.uk <mailto:Andy.Reid at lshtm.ac.uk>>:
> If you do an export of 'EP3 with files Embedded' that will show you the basic layout you need, and you just need to strip out the eprintID , documentID and fileID tags in order to have each of those entities to make a template that will create them on the fly with new IDs. If you have multiple files per eprint you probably want each file inside a separate document tag.
> 
> Here's one I prepared earlier:
> 
> 
> 
> <eprints>
>  
> <eprint>
> <type>article</type>
> <publication_abbrev>Am J Epidemiol</publication_abbrev>
> <publication>American journal of epidemiology</publication>
> <issn>0002-9262</issn>
> <eissn>1476-6256</eissn>
> <isbn/>
> <book_title/>
> <pmid>26022663</pmid>
> <isi/>
> <id_number>10.1093/aje/kwv010</id_number>
> <title>Analysis of preventive interventions for malaria: exploring partial and complete protection, and total and primary intervention effects</title>
> <date>2015</date>
> <volume/>
> <number/>
> <publisher/>
> <place_of_pub/>
> <pagerange/>
> <creators>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Cairns</family>
> <given>M</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Cheung</family>
> <given>YB</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Xu</family>
> <given>Y</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Asante</family>
> <given>KP</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Owusu-Agyei</family>
> <given>S</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Diallo</family>
> <given>D</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Konate</family>
> <given>AT</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Dicko</family>
> <given>A</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Chandramohan</family>
> <given>D</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Greenwood</family>
> <given>B</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> <item>
> <name>
> <family>Milligan</family>
> <given>P</given>
> </name>
> <id/>
> 
> </item>
> </creators>
> <divisions>
> <item>ITDC</item>
> <item>EPID</item>
> </divisions>
> <ispublished>pub</ispublished>
> <keywords/>
> <abstract> Event dependence, the phenomenon in which future risk depends on past disease history, is not commonly accounted for in the statistical models used by malaria researchers. However, recently developed methods for the analysis of repeated events allow this to be done, while also accounting for heterogeneity in risk and nonsusceptible subgroups. Accounting for event dependence allows separation of the primary effect of an intervention from its total effect, which is composed of its primary effect on risk of disease and its secondary effect mediated by event dependence. To illustrate these methods and show the insights they can provide, we have reanalyzed 2 trials of seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) in Bouss?, Burkina Faso, and Kati, Mali, in 2008-2009, as well as a trial of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants in Navrongo, Ghana, in 2000-2004. SMC completely protects a large fraction of recipients, while intermittent preventive treatment in infants provides modest partial protection, consistent with the rationale of these 2 different chemopreventive approaches. SMC has a primary effect that is substantially greater than the total effect previously estimated by trials, with the lower total effect mediated by negative event dependence. These methods contribute to an understanding of the mechanisms of protection from these interventions and could improve understanding of other tools to control malaria, including vaccines. </abstract>
> <datestamp/>
> <lastmod/>
> <metadata_visibility>show</metadata_visibility>
> <date_type>published</date_type>
> <refereed>TRUE</refereed>
> <official_url/>
> <documents>
> <document>
> <mime_type/>
> <format>text</format>
> <language>en</language>
> <security>public</security>
> <license>cc_by</license>
> <main/>
> <content>published</content>
> <files>
> <file>
> <datasetid>document</datasetid>
> <filename>Manuscript_32.zip</filename>
> <mime_type>application/zip</mime_type>
> <hash>9900cfaca2bb473c1766f278dfae3937</hash>
> <hash_type>MD5</hash_type>
> <filesize>425934 </filesize>
> <mtime/>
> <data encoding="base64">UEsDBBQAAAAIAPSGyUYMubkJHn8GACLiCAAnAAAAQ0FJUk5TIC0gZmluYWwgdmVyc2lvbiBhcyBzdWJtaXR0ZWQucGRm7P1ZDPNsuy4GCahacPlpD1oQQlv9Mg+243lI4gwe4jiT48SZnMnxlMROPCbZXbtARVtUoXJQKiZVKgeA6EnFIPWAIlHRVhvRgaoIKIOKoGpLK3GCBFJbBiHyft//r7X+/1u7e7HZh/WrvPZzx36e+7p9D9cdv8lb0iQZxhrUb0r/2r/+L/2vfkMy7E/oT7Ed/IbjfoNM/cizMv/v8tyfsAb6Hf9EsTj2PeWnn36DKD8dfmo2cQr76cf2lf/0y3b6DTL/iWTRX0a/QQY/YSiKMvjPA/UnEvsNsvqJYnCKIX4WaT+hv+l2f+NF7o9l/yjzrj9rQbA//Qb97YZRP/28/yn6DfBbSZNg/lCGowz6KxlBkL+SkeSvZfRXwT+UNVnsD2UEjv9qDY
> ...
> ...
> ...
> uP/D1BLAQIAABQAAAAIAPSGyUYMubkJHn8GACLiCAAnAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAABDQUlSTlMgLSBmaW5hbCB2ZXJzaW9uIGFzIHN1Ym1pdHRlZC5wZGZQSwUGAAAAAAEAAQBVAAAAY38GAAAA</data></file></files></document></documents></eprint>
> </eprints>
> >>> Edwin Gamez <edwingamez19 at gmail.com <mailto:edwingamez19 at gmail.com>> 22 September 2015 17:08 >>>
> Hello everyone.
> 
> I wonder if there is any way to import the metadata along with the files. You could do it through a script?
> 
> Thanks everyone!
> 
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> 
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